slow exercise after menopause

Slow Exercise Is Better For Menopausal Women Than Fast Exercise

According to researchers led by Dr Alexandra Sänger from the University of Salzburg a recently devised exercise system called SuperSlow which involves much slower movement and fewer repetitions of exercises is more effective.

I am so glad to see that it is a specific methodology and not an implication that we just move much slower. LOL

Via: Society for Experimental Biology

Article: http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/114119.php

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6 Responses

  1. Nice post.Keep up with the good information!

  2. My book The Slow Burn Fitness Revolution describes in detail 2 great programs for adults to use for gaining the benefits of Slow weight training.

    I offer anyone who needs it complimentary advice. Simply email me at FHahn@seriousstrength.com and I would be more than happy to help. My new book Strong Kids Healthy Kids will focus on slow training for kids as well as ow to stop adolescent obesity dead in its tracks. http://www.strongkidshealthykids.com.

  3. Despite the claims of SuperSlow and other slow training advocates, there is no evidence that very slow repetition speeds provide any significant benefits over more traditional speeds. A study published in the Journal of Exercise Physiology Online by Brian Johnston showed no significant improvements in muscular loading and no significant reduction in peak f0rces (an indication of injury potential) between a 2 second lifting, 4 second lowering movement, and a 10 second lifting, 10 second lowering movement.

    Any benefit that can be achieved with SuperSlow training or offshoots like Slow Burn, Power of 10, Concept 10/10, etc., can be achieved equally effectively and safely with similar protocols using more moderate repetition speeds.

    For a brief review of the research on SuperSlow training, see http://baye.com/a-review-of-research-on-superslow%c2%ae-high-intensity-strength-training/

  4. I appreciate the feedback on this issue. I have just joined a gym with the initial plan being just to be able to walk on a treadmill or use an elliptical in a climate controlled area. But I also know that I will want to move into some strength training to try to compensate for the strength and range I’ve lost to treatment. I’m looking to avoid injury more than anything else so I am trying to do a little homework. Thanks again!

  5. I think I can do that. Slower sounds better to me. 🙂

  6. Did the site eat my comment?

    Anyway, I like this idea, think I’ll slow it down a notch!

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